Euromaidan: Impossible Is Possible

Protesters on Hrushevskoho Street, January 24. Illustration for Ann Hnedkova's "Euromaidan: Impossible is Possible."
Protesters on Hrushevskoho Street, January 24. Source: Wired.com. Photographer: Brendan Hoffman

Ann Hnedkova
National University of “Kyiv-Mohyla Academy”
Faculty of Humanities
Master Program of Philology (1st year)
from Kyiv city

Throughout Euromaidan Revolution, one question was verbalized or thought of by its participants more often than any other: “How is that possible?” The same question constantly interrupts my conversations with international friends about the recent Ukrainian events. It seems that the question is not going to lose its relevance after the Euromaidan phenomenon. That is why its origin, evolution, and meaning are needed to explain.

November 21, 2013. The question of possibility becomes a mover of people. The Ukraine’s suspense of European Union trade preparation is announced. Kyiv reacts with peaceful protests with European Union flags, student strikes, and the improvised stage at the Maidan Nezalezhnosti square. Dancing, singing the Hymn of Ukraine, and not leaving the square until our voices are being heard. How is that possible that the government does not react? Maybe it is worth arranging more peaceful meetings, encouraging more people to join, and waiting? Read more

Euromaindan: Revision of the World Diplomac

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Nazar Gavryshko
National University of “Kyiv-Mohyla Academy”
Faculty of Computer Sciences
Master Program (1st year)
from Kamyanka Buzkatown, Lviv region

The whole world was watching dramatic events happening in Ukraine during the last three months when Ukrainian Maidan revealed the weakness of the world diplomacy nobody had talked about before.

First of all, the system of international deals has appeared to be broken. Ukraine was guaranteed to be protected by USA, Great Britain and Russia as a member of Budapest memorandum, 1994. But, as we see now, the Russian Federation, which was a guarantor of Ukrainian sovereignty, is performing direct aggression against Ukraine by annexing Crimea region. At the same time the USA and Great Britain fold their hands just watching and being deeply concerned. So, we can tell that international deals made even between such world giants as the USA, Russia and Great Britain do not guarantee safety and territorial integrity. Read more

What Should We do with the Donbas?

ДОНЕЦКАЯ РЕСПУБЛИКА

Taras Kuzio

Donetsk and Luhansk oblasts (Donbas) are in the hands of terrorist separatists. Kyiv’s Anti-Terrorist Operation (a better name could have been given for this) is making progress in some cities but because Kyiv (unlike Russia in Chechnya) is unwilling to accept large numbers of civilian casualties progress will be limited. Historians and political experts will spend the next few years analysing how this region was so quickly taken over which can be reduced to five factors:

Firstly, undoubtedly Russian “green men” played an important role in giving professional expertise to hitherto marginal pan-Slavic and pro-Russian groups. Read more

Інтерв’ю Володимира Кулика про роль українських медій в ситуації зовнішньої агресії з боку Росії

 Координатор Сучасного українського дослідницького форуму: Справа Євромайдану  Олександр Панкєєв взяв інтерв’ю у  Володимира Кулика про роль українських ЗМІ в ситуації зовнішньої агресії з боку Росії. Володимир Кулик – доктор політичних наук, провідний науковий співробітник відділу етнополітології Інституту політичних і етнонаціональних досліджень ім. І. Ф. Кураса НАН України.  Коло його інтересів охоплює  дослідження медійного дискурсу, мовної політики, мовних ідеологій, політики пам’яті, етнополітики, ідентичності та націоналізму. 

Interview of Volodymyr Kulyk about the role of the Ukrainian media in  the situation of  the external aggression from Russia

Oleksandr Pankieiev, coordinator of the Contemporary Ukraine Research Forum: The Case of Euromaidan, interviewed Dr. Volodymyr Kulyk,  senior research fellow, ethnopolitics department, Institute of Political and Ethnic Studies, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine. His research fields include the media discourse, language policy, language ideologies, politics of memory, ethnopolitcs, identity, nationalism. In his interview Dr Volodymyr Kulyk  talks about the role of the Ukrainian media in  the situation of  the external aggression from Russia.

Volodymyr Kravchenko on Putin’s Ukraine Doctrine

Putin’s Ukraine Doctrine: in captivity stereotypes

Volodymyr Kravchenko,
CIUS Director,
University of Alberta, Edmonton

1395224096_krim-russkiy The two heads of the eagle on Russia’s coat of arms, said to face both East and West, seem today to be pulling to the past and to the future, history and geography. In Eastern Europe, geography is in constant battle with history, never more so than today as Russia tests its new/old political doctrine in Ukraine.

President Putin held a telethon on April 17 designed to highlight his Ukraine policy following on his annexation of Crimea. Performing supporting roles at this stage-managed ceremony were representatives of the Russian opposition and Western analysts, members of the Valdai Club. I hope those in attendance won’t take offense, but they were a sorry spectacle.

Read more

Interview with Vadym Khmarsky

Vadym Khmarsky: “Odesa has no problems with Ukrainian patriotism”

Oleksandr Pankieiev, coordinator of the Contemporary Ukraine Research Forum: The Case of Euromaidan, interviewed Vadym Khmarsky, Ukrainian historian, Professor, Head of Department of History of Ukraine and Vice-President of the Odessa National University. Vadym Khmarsky told Oleksandr Pankieiev about the preconditions of the Ukrainian crisis and shared his own feelings.

Round Table on the Future of Ukraine

Round Table with David R. Marples and Taras Kuzio: “Russia’s Annexation of Crimea and the Future of Ukraine”


CIUS Round table Thursday, 3 April 2014, “Russia’s Annexation of Crimea and the Future of Ukraine” featuring the institute’s two leading specialists on the subject, David R. Marples and Taras Kuzio.
The Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies continues to monitor and assess the situation in Ukraine, thereby providing important academic and community services.

The US and EU Must Take New Steps Quickly to Help Ukraine

Dr. Taras Kuzio

News organizations last week reported a new conclusion by US intelligence agencies that Russian forces massed on Ukraine’s eastern borders are increasingly likely to invade mainland Ukraine, only weeks after seizing Crimea. Russian President Vladimir Putin is determined to undermine the political legitimacy of a Ukrainian government that has shown itself insistent on aligning with the European Union rather than Russia. And that means derailing the May 25 election in which Ukraine will certainly choose a president who would pursue that European option. A successful election would unravel Putin’s argument that Viktor Yanukovych, who fled Ukraine last month into Russian exile, remains Ukraine’s legitimately elected president. Read more