Bohdan Nahaylo on Ukraine’s Presidential Election

Bohdan Nahaylo: “Ukraine’s Presidential Election Hopes and Blues”

Photo: Ballot boxes. Illustration for Bohdan Nahaylo's “Ukraine’s Presidential Election Hopes and Blues”
Ballot boxes. Source: intvua.com

After tense weeks of waiting and uncertainty, Ukraine has managed to elect a new president in the first round of voting. The convincing victory of Petro Poroshenko symbolizes the consolidated will of a people united and determined to be itself, to exercise its right to self-determination both in its choice of a transparent democratic system of government and in its alignment with the Euro-Atlantic community and its values. Read more

Poroshenko’s Finlandisation and Non-Bloc Status vs Tymoshenko’s NATO

Photo: Petro Poroshenko. Illustration for Taras Kuzio's "Poroshenko’s Finlandisation and Non-Bloc Status vs Tymoshenko’s NATO."
Petro Poroshenko. Source: tsn.ua

Taras Kuzio 

Support for NATO membership is at an all-time high of 44% – the highest it has ever been was in the late 1990s (before the emergence of the anti-NATO and anti-American Party of Regions) when it was a third in favour. What polls also show is a decline of the number of Ukrainians who are against NATO membership from a very high figure under President Viktor Yanukovych to figures even lower than in the late 1990s when a third opposed. Read more

Three Fears Which Came True During Euromaidan

Image: Euromaidan poster. Illustration for Anna Lachykhina's "Three Fears Which Came True During Euromaidan."
Euromaidan poster. Source: euromaydan.in

Anna Lachykhina
National University of “Kyiv-Mohyla Academy”
Faculty of Social Sciences and Social Technologies,
Master Program of Political Science (1st year)
from Simferopol, Crimea

Being born in an independent country, living in peace in the civilized world of 21st century, I have never thought of bombs, weapons, and battle causalities or even deaths as something more realistic than historical facts from textbooks. Euromaidan started as a peaceful demonstration and turned out into a hostile confrontation between the Ukrainian riot police and activists. At this point awful scenes from the history became the heartbreaking reality where my three militaristic fears came true. Read more

Love in the Time of War

Photo: A couple embrace on the Euromaidan. Illustration for Mariya Kharitonyuk's "Love in the Time of War."
A couple embrace on the Euromaidan. Source: 7days-ua.com

Mariya Kharitonyuk
Faculty of Humanities,
Master Program of Philology (1st year),
from Lutsk city, Volyn’ region

A title of this essay is the name of a song written by Boris Grebenshikov, leader of Russian rock band ‘Aquarium’. He has created this music composition specially for Ukraine and dedicated it to Maidan’s events. I want these words to commence my essay and become its main idea. It is really difficult to write my own opinion on this piece of paper, because here Maidan is merely the space for my thoughts, but those people have lived on Maidan. Or died there. Read more

When My People Go

Photo: Евромайдан / Euromaidan. Illustration for Tetyana Kalytenko's "When My People Go"
Евромайдан / Euromaidan. Source: torange.us

Tetyana Kalytenko
Faculty of Humanities,
Master Program (1st year),
from Kyiv

There is no arguing with the fact that during the struggle for democracy that Ukraine has recently been going through, EuroMaidan has become a unique phenomenon and a sacred place of spiritual rebirth for my nation, where one can experience the Ukrainian culture expressed so vividly in people’s holy love for freedom in spirit, word and deed!

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#EUROMAIDAN – History In The Making

(c) Oleksandr Stryzhelchyk. From #EUROMAIDAN - History In The Making.
Copyright Oleksandr Stryzhelchyk
Osnovy Publishing together with ART Management agency will release the first major publication on the Euromaidan. #EUROMAIDAN – History In The Making will bring together iconic and memorable photographs captured by Ukrainian photographers throughout the revolutionary events in Kyiv between November 2013 and February 2014. 

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Euromaidan: What We Gained

A police barrier in the Maidan, February 19. Illustration for Olena Iagniuk's "Euromaidan: What We Gained."
A police barrier in the Maidan, February 19. Source: Businessweek. Photographer: Brendan Hoffman.

Olena Iagniuk
National University of “Kyiv-Mohyla Academy”
Faculty of Economics
Master Program (1st year)
from Kharkiv city

A lot of people claim that the major achievement of Euromaidan is the downfall of the previous political regime. It is, undoubtedly, true; however, it would be unfair not to mention other important consequences of the recent events happening in Ukraine: the unification of citizens, world community recognition of Ukrainian nation’s democratic values, and a great lesson for future politicians. All of them are of significant importance and should be neither neglected nor forgotten.

First of all, with the help of Euromaidan, Ukrainians realized that they are all a part of the one whole. While fighting for freedom, democracy, and better future, the people showed an extreme sense of unity, support, and mutual help, which might not appear explicitly in peaceful times. There was no prejudice concerning age, nationality, origin, or place of living: brave people from Donetsk and Kharkiv were standing side by side with the citizens of Lviv and Ternopil at the barricades in Kyiv, without facing any kind of language or cultural barriers. Common values and clear vision of the reason that had lead them to Maidan Nezalezhnosti allowed people from all parts of the country to become one single powerful mechanism; the understanding of this fact, in turn, made people stronger, both physically and mentally, in their struggle. Read more

Euromaidan: Impossible Is Possible

Protesters on Hrushevskoho Street, January 24. Illustration for Ann Hnedkova's "Euromaidan: Impossible is Possible."
Protesters on Hrushevskoho Street, January 24. Source: Wired.com. Photographer: Brendan Hoffman

Ann Hnedkova
National University of “Kyiv-Mohyla Academy”
Faculty of Humanities
Master Program of Philology (1st year)
from Kyiv city

Throughout Euromaidan Revolution, one question was verbalized or thought of by its participants more often than any other: “How is that possible?” The same question constantly interrupts my conversations with international friends about the recent Ukrainian events. It seems that the question is not going to lose its relevance after the Euromaidan phenomenon. That is why its origin, evolution, and meaning are needed to explain.

November 21, 2013. The question of possibility becomes a mover of people. The Ukraine’s suspense of European Union trade preparation is announced. Kyiv reacts with peaceful protests with European Union flags, student strikes, and the improvised stage at the Maidan Nezalezhnosti square. Dancing, singing the Hymn of Ukraine, and not leaving the square until our voices are being heard. How is that possible that the government does not react? Maybe it is worth arranging more peaceful meetings, encouraging more people to join, and waiting? Read more

Orobets is the European Choice for Kyiv – not Klitschko

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Taras Kuzio

The re-registration of Lesya Orobets as a candidate for Kyiv Mayor was the right and just decision to make. The actions of the UDAR-Solidarity team in attempting to remove her show how little they have in common with democracy and European values (as to fighting corruption they cannot have anything in common when Dmytro Firtash is financing Petro Poroshenko’s election campaign). Read more

Euromaindan: Revision of the World Diplomac

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Nazar Gavryshko
National University of “Kyiv-Mohyla Academy”
Faculty of Computer Sciences
Master Program (1st year)
from Kamyanka Buzkatown, Lviv region

The whole world was watching dramatic events happening in Ukraine during the last three months when Ukrainian Maidan revealed the weakness of the world diplomacy nobody had talked about before.

First of all, the system of international deals has appeared to be broken. Ukraine was guaranteed to be protected by USA, Great Britain and Russia as a member of Budapest memorandum, 1994. But, as we see now, the Russian Federation, which was a guarantor of Ukrainian sovereignty, is performing direct aggression against Ukraine by annexing Crimea region. At the same time the USA and Great Britain fold their hands just watching and being deeply concerned. So, we can tell that international deals made even between such world giants as the USA, Russia and Great Britain do not guarantee safety and territorial integrity. Read more